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Responses Category

Our Trade Law System

Jun. 5, 2020—Kathleen Claussen | 73 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 195 (2020) | In Misaligned Lawmaking, Timothy Meyer identifies a major problem in U.S. trade law design. Professor Meyer argues that there is a misalignment between trade liberalization laws—laws that enable the executive branch to lower trade barriers with other countries—and trade adjustment assistance laws—laws that...

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Irrational Inequality: The Role of Fact-Based Review in Equality Change

May. 27, 2020—Katie Eyer | 73 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 177 (2020) | In Broken Records: Reconceptualizing Rational Basis Review to Address “Alternative Facts” in the Legislative Process, Joseph Landau offers an important exposition of how legislative records “predicated on a false factual foundation” are, and ought to be, treated by constitutional equality law. As Landau...

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Making Litigating Citizenship More Fair

May. 14, 2020—Ming H. Chen | 73 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 133 (2020) | In Litigating Citizenship, Cassandra Burke Robertson and Irina D. Manta chart the contours of expanding immigration enforcement in the Trump administration: from criminal aliens and illegal aliens, to legal immigrants, to naturalized citizens. In their own words, their interest is “How do...

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Neighborhood Names: Why Should the Law Care?

Aug. 27, 2019—Nadav Shoked | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 267 | Names matter. We all realize that they matter for our lives, but we do not intuitively assume that names matter for the law just as well. And yet, in many legal fields, they clearly do. In international law, the question what country gets to...

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Corporate Incapacitation: A Handmaid’s Tale?

Aug. 27, 2019—Mihailis E. Diamantis | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 251 | In Incapacitating Criminal Corporations, W. Robert Thomas argues that corporate criminal law should think more creatively about incapacitation. As a general rule, I could not agree more with his motivating sentiment: inflexible dominant paradigms have stifled thought about how to sanction corporations for...

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What to do about Chevron—Nothing

Apr. 29, 2019—Nicholas R. Bednar | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 151 | For thirty-five years, doctrinalists have tormented themselves trying to dissect the Supreme Court’s most infamous administrative-law doctrine: Chevron deference. We have asked when and how it applies. At the same time, we have asked whether Chevron should exist at all. In other words, does Chevron have any...

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Towards Optimal Enforcement

Apr. 2, 2019—Kent Barnett | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 127 | Enforcing federal law seems simple enough. Federal agencies, which exist for exactly this purpose, enforce by identifying violations of a particular federal statutory scheme and accompanying regulations. But complications quickly arise. How should agencies enforce—by initiating judicial proceedings, by enacting rules or guidance to...

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Personal Jurisdiction: The Walls Blocking an Appeal to Rationality

Feb. 6, 2019—Richard D. Freer | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 99 | Personal jurisdiction is a gateway to the judicial system. Without it, a plaintiff cannot vindicate her claims and the community cannot benefit from private enforcement of the law. In 2011, the Supreme Court returned to personal jurisdiction after a twenty-one year hiatus. Over...

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Chevron on Stilts: A Response to Jonathan Siegel

Oct. 15, 2018—Chevron-on-Stilts-A-Response-to-Jonathan-Siegel AUTHOR: Philip Hamburger

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Legal Jurisdiction and the Deterritorialization of Data

Feb. 2, 2018—Legal Jurisdiction and the Deterritorialization of Data Response to Jennifer Daskal, Borders and Bits, 71 Vand. L. Rev. 179 (2018). AUTHOR Paul Schiff Berman Walter S. Cox Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School.

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Commodified Promises and Contract Theory

Jan. 26, 2018—Commodified Promises and Contract Response to Erik Encarnacion, Contract as Commodified Promise, 71 Vand. L. Rev. 61 (2018). AUTHOR Brian H. Bix Frederick W. Thomas Professor of Law and Philosophy, University of Minnesota.  

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Neutral Principles and Political Power: A Response to Reverse Political Process Theory

Nov. 5, 2017—Neutral-Principles-and-Political-Power1 Response to Aaron Tang, Reverse Political Process Theory, 70 Vand. L. Rev. 1427 (2017). AUTHOR Matthew A. Seligman Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law, Harvard Law School.  

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Lost in Transplantation: The Supreme Court’s Post-Prudence Jurisprudence

Oct. 18, 2017—Lost in Transplantation The Supreme Court’s Post-Prudence Jurisprudence Response to Fred Smith, Undemocratic Restraint, 70 Vand. L. Rev. 845 (2017). AUTHOR Adam N. Steinman University Research Professor of Law, University of Alabama School of Law.  

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Institutional Effects on Reciprocal Legitimation in the Federal Courts

May. 23, 2017—Institutional Effects on Reciprocal Legitimation in the Federal Courts Response to Neil S. Siegel, Reciprocal Legitimation in the Federal Courts System, 70 Vand. L. Rev. 1183 (2017). AUTHOR Donald P. Klekamp Professor of Law, University of Cincinnati College of Law

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A Mild Defense of Our New Machine Overlords

May. 23, 2017—A Mild Defense of Our New Machine Overlords Response to Kiel Brennan-Marquez, “Plausible Cause”: Explanatory Standards in the Age of Powerful Machines, 70 Vand. L. Rev. 1249 (2017). AUTHOR Visiting Fellow, Yale Information Society Project; Visiting Researcher, Georgetown University Law Center. J.D. 2011, University of Michigan.  

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Short-Circuiting the New Major Questions Doctrine

Apr. 25, 2017—Short-Circuiting the New Major Questions Doctrine Response to Michael Coenen & Seth Davis, Minor Courts, Major Questions, 70 Vand. L. Rev. 777 (2017). ABSTRACT In Minor Courts, Major Questions, Michael Coenen and Seth Davis advance perhaps the most provocative proposal to date to address the new major questions doctrine articulated in King v. Burwell. They...

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