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Volume 71, Number 5

Access to Justice, Rationality, and Personal Jurisdiction

Oct. 19, 2018—Access-to-Justice-Rationality-and-Personal-Jurisdiction ABSTRACT: After more than twenty years of silence, the Supreme Court has addressed personal jurisdiction six times over the last six Terms. This Article examines the Court’s recent decisions in terms of their effect on access to justice and the enforcement of substantive law. The Court’s new case law has unquestionably made it harder...

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Administrative Law’s Political Dynamics

Oct. 19, 2018—Administrative-Laws-Political-Dynamics ABSTRACT: Over thirty years ago, the Supreme Court in Chevron, U.S.A., Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc. commanded courts to uphold federal agency interpretations of ambiguous statutes as long as those interpretations are reasonable. This Chevron deference doctrine was based in part on the Court’s desire to temper administrative law’s political dynamics by...

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Hindsight Bias in Antitrust Law

Oct. 19, 2018—Hindsight-Bias-in-Antitrust-Law AUTHOR: Christopher R. Leslie

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The Jim Crow Jury

Oct. 19, 2018—The-Jim-Crow-Jury ABSTRACT: Since the end of Reconstruction, the criminal jury box has both reflected and reproduced racial hierarchies in the United States. In the Plessy era, racial exclusion from juries was central to the reassertion of white supremacy. But it also generated pushback: a movement resisting “the Jim Crow jury” actively fought, both inside and...

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The Trouble with Corporate Conscience

Oct. 19, 2018—The-Trouble-with-Corporate-Conscience ABSTRACT: Accomplished corporate law scholars claim that modern businesses need an infusion of morality. Disappointed by conventional regulatory responses to recurring corporate scandal, these scholars argue that corporate conscience provides a more fruitful path to systemic economic reform. In Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, which held that for-profit businesses can claim religious exemptions from general...

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Common Sense: Rethinking the New Common Rule’s Weak Protections for Human Subjects

Oct. 19, 2018—Common-Sense-Rethinking-the-New-Common-Rule27s-Weak-Protections-for-Human-Subjects ABSTRACT: Since 1991, the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, known as the “Common Rule,” has protected the identifiable private information of human subjects who participate in federally funded research initiatives. Although the research landscape has drastically changed since 1991, the Common Rule has remained mostly unchanged since its promulgation. In an...

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Trafficked in Texas: Combatting the Sex-Trafficking Epidemic Through Prostitution Law and Sentencing Reform in the Lone Star State

Oct. 19, 2018—Trafficked-in-Texas-Combatting-the-Sex-Trafficking-Epidemic-Through-Prostitution-Law-and-Sentencing-Reform-in-the-Lone-Star-State ABSTRACT: American law has historically treated prostitution as a victimless crime, a moral trespass between two consenting individuals, rather than a potential act of violence, a product of fraud or coercion. However, growing awareness of the international sex-trafficking epidemic has brought long-settled prostitution law once more under the critical eye of academics and lawmakers...

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