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Deterring Algorithmic Manipulation

Mar. 24, 2021—Gina-Gail S. Fletcher | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 259 (2021) | Does the existing anti-manipulation framework effectively deter algorithmic manipulation? With the dual increase of algorithmic trading and the occurrence of “mini-flash crashes” in the market linked to manipulation, this question has become more pressing in recent years. In the past thirty years, the financial...

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Data Autonomy

Mar. 24, 2021—Cesare Fracassi & William Magnuson | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 327 (2021) | In recent years, “data privacy” has vaulted to the forefront of public attention. Scholars, policymakers, and the media have, nearly in unison, decried the lack of data privacy in the modern world. In response, they have put forth various proposals to remedy...

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Presidential Control of Elections

Mar. 24, 2021—Lisa Marshall Manheim | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 385 (2021) | In recent decades, presidents of both political parties have asserted increasingly aggressive forms of influence over the administrative state. During this same period, Congress has expanded the role that the federal government plays in election administration. The convergence of these two trends leads to...

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Checks and Balances in the Criminal Law

Jan. 26, 2021—Daniel Epps | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1 (2021) | The separation of powers is considered essential in the criminal law, where liberty and even life are at stake. Yet the reasons for separating criminal powers are surprisingly opaque, and the “separation of powers” is often used to refer to distinct, and sometimes contradictory, concepts....

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Rethinking Swing Voters

Jan. 26, 2021—Jonathan S. Gould | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 85 (2021) | In recent decades, swing voters in courts and legislatures have made many of the United States’ most important decisions of law and policy. It would be easy to conclude from the recent history of the Supreme Court and Congress that democracy or majority rule...

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The Research Patent

Jan. 26, 2021—Sean B. Seymore | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 143 (2021) | The patent system gives courts the discretion to tailor patentability standards flexibly across technologies to provide optimal incentives for innovation. For chemical inventions, the courts deem them unpatentable if the chemical lacks a practical, non-research-based use at the time patent protection is sought. The...

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Symposium: Governing Wicked Problems, Introduction

Dec. 22, 2020—J.B. Ruhl & James Salzman | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1561 (2020) | The purpose of this Article is . . . to provide in legal scholarship a concise summary of wicked problems theory from its roots in Rittel and Webber’s article through its evolution in policy science and planning scholarship. Not coincidentally, this sets...

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De- and Re-constructing Public Governance for Biodiversity Conservation

Dec. 22, 2020—Alejandro E. Camacho | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1585 (2020) | Is biodiversity loss wicked? What has been done about it? And how might public governance be altered to improve the prognosis? A substantial and growing number of scholars have sought to define and characterize incredibly complex social problems, alternatively labelled as “messes,” “swamp[s],” “massive,”...

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Wicked Problems, Foolish Decisions: Promoting Sustainability Through Urban Governance in a Complex World

Dec. 22, 2020—Scott D. Campbell & Moira Zellner | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1643 (2020) | Why do wicked problems often give birth to bad policy choices? Put another way, why do people—in the face of complex social challenges—make misdiagnoses, ineffective decisions, or no decisions at all? Typical answers point to a plethora of suspects: impatience, myopia,...

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Designing Law to Enable Adaptive Governance of Modern Wicked Problems

Dec. 22, 2020—Barbara A. Cosens, J.B. Ruhl, Niko Soininen & Lance Gunderson | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1687 (2020) |  In the twenty-first century, our planet is facing a period of rapid and fundamental change resulting from human domination so extensive it is expected to be visible in the geologic record. The accelerating rate of change compounds...

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Resilience Theory and Wicked Problems

Dec. 22, 2020—Robin Kundis Craig | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1733 (2020) | This Article posits, first, that resilience theory offers important insights into our understanding of wicked problems and, second, that to understand the value of resilience theory to wicked problems, we should start by going back to the context of Rittel’s and Webber’s 1973 delineation...

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Beyond Wickedness: Managing Complex Systems and Climate Change

Dec. 22, 2020—Jonathan M. Gilligan & Michael P. Vandenbergh | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1777 (2020) | This Article examines the argument that climate change is a “super wicked” problem. It concludes that the wicked problem concept is best viewed as a rhetorical device that served a valuable function in arguing against technocratic hubris in the early...

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The Super Wicked Problem of Donald Trump

Dec. 22, 2020—Richard J. Lazarus | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1811 (2020) | In 2009 I published a law review article that both explained why I believed that climate change was a “super wicked” problem for lawmakers and offered specific recommendations for ways that any laws addressing climate change should be crafted in light of its super...

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Governance of Emerging Technologies as a Wicked Problem

Dec. 22, 2020—Gary E. Marchant | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1861 (2020) | Governance of emerging technologies . . . presents a conundrum. No single optimum solution exists, but rather a collection of second-best strategies intersect, coexist, and—in some ways—compete. This situation seems unsatisfactory until it is observed through the lens of the “wicked problem” framework. The...

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The Wicked Problem of Zoning

Dec. 22, 2020—Christopher Serkin | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1879 (2020) | Zoning is the quintessential wicked problem. Professors Rittel and Webber, writing in the 1970s, identified as “wicked” those problems that technocratic expertise cannot necessarily solve. Wicked problems arise when the very definition of the problem is contested and outcomes are not measured by “right and...

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“White Men’s Roads Through Black Men’s Homes”: Advancing Racial Equity Through Highway Reconstruction

Oct. 19, 2020—Deborah N. Archer | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1259 (2020) | Racial and economic segregation in urban communities is often understood as a natural consequence of poor choices by individuals. In reality, racially and economically segregated cities are the result of many factors, including the nation’s interstate highway system. In states around the country, highway...

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