Skip to main content

Articles Category

The People’s Ledger: How to Democratize Money and Finance the Economy

Oct. 19, 2021—Saule T. Omarova | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1301 (2021) | The COVID-19 crisis underscored the urgency of digitizing sovereign money and ensuring universal access to banking services. It pushed two related ideas—the issuance of central bank digital currency and the provision of retail deposit accounts by central banks—to the forefront of the public policy debate....

Read more


Central Banks and Climate Change

Oct. 19, 2021—Christina Parajon Skinner | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1301 (2021) | Central banks are increasingly called upon to address climate change. Proposals for central bank action on climate change range from programs of “green” quantitative easing to increases in risk-based capital requirements meant to deter banks from lending to climate-unfriendly business. Politicians and academics alike have...

Read more


Praxis and Paradox: Inside the Black Box of Eviction Court

Oct. 19, 2021—Lauren Sudeall & Daniel Pasciuti | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1365 (2021) | In the American legal system, we typically conceive of legal disputes as governed by specific rules and procedures, resolved in a formalized court setting, with lawyers shepherding both parties through an adversarial process involving the introduction of evidence and burdens of proof. The...

Read more


Underwater Mortgages for Underwater Homes: The Elimination of Signals in the Coastal Lending Market

Oct. 19, 2021—Peyton J. Klein | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1467 (2021) | Climate change and sea level rise threaten to increase the default risk of mortgages on homes in coastal areas. Faced with this reality, small coastal lenders have begun selling more climate-sensitive mortgages to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, thereby transferring the risk of climate-induced...

Read more


The Distributive Impacts of Nudnik-based Activism

Sep. 10, 2021—Meirav Furth-Matzkin | 74 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 469 (2021) | In Theory of the Nudnik: The Future of Consumer Activism and What We Can Do to Stop It, Professors Yonathan Arbel and Roy Shapira propose that nudnik customers should be lauded for acting as engines of market discipline. According to Arbel and Shapira,...

Read more


Remaking Carceral Policy: A Response to Littman

Sep. 10, 2021—Keramet Reiter | 74 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 457 (2021) | Aaron Littman’s Jails, Sheriffs, and Carceral Policymaking marshals an immense amount of empirical data, drawn from a dizzying array of legal and policy sources, to reframe our thinking about what is and should be possible in criminal justice reform at the local level....

Read more


The Price of Free Elections

Aug. 26, 2021—G. Michael Parsons | 74 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 335 (2021) | How much does an election cost? For a democracy as old as ours, the answer is surprisingly unclear . . . . Among the many contributions of Democracy on a Shoestring, then, is to spur more concrete thinking about the costs and...

Read more


Rethinking the Silent Treatment

Aug. 22, 2021—Sasha Gombar | 74 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 289 (2021) | When the hashtag “MeToo” was popularized in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, the underlying philosophy was simple. Too many people had claimed that women’s stories about sexual assault lacked corroboration, dismissing evidence of workplace sexism as merely “anecdotal.” However, when enough women started telling...

Read more


Jails, Sheriffs, and Carceral Policymaking

May. 28, 2021—Aaron Littman | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 861 (2021) | The machinery of mass incarceration in America is huge, intricate, and destructive. To understand it and to tame it, scholars and activists look for its levers of power—where are they, who holds them, and what motivates them? This much we know: legislators criminalize, police arrest,...

Read more


Why Supervise Banks? The Foundations of the American Monetary Settlement

May. 28, 2021—Lev Menand | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 951 (2021) | Administrative agencies are generally designed to operate at arm’s length, making rules and adjudicating cases. But the banking agencies are different: they are designed to supervise. They work cooperatively with banks and their remedial powers are so extensive they rarely use them. Oversight proceeds through...

Read more


Police Arbitration

May. 28, 2021—Stephen Rushin | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1023 (2021) | Before punishing an officer for professional misconduct, police departments often provide the officer with an opportunity to file an appeal. In many police departments, this appeals process culminates in a hearing before an arbitrator. While numerous media reports have suggested that arbitrators regularly overturn or...

Read more


Democracy on a Shoestring

May. 28, 2021—Joshua S. Sellers & Roger Michalski | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1079 (2021) |  Democracy requires money. Voters must be registered, voting rolls updated, election dates advertised, voting technology purchased and tested, poll workers trained, ballots designed, votes counted and verified, and on and on. Despite the importance of election expenditures, we have a shamefully...

Read more


The Shadows of Litigation Finance

Apr. 20, 2021—Suneal Bedi & William C. Marra | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 563 (2021) | Litigation finance is quickly becoming a centerpiece of our legal system. Once a dispute arises, litigants may seek money from third-party financiers to pay their legal bills or monetize their claims, and in turn those financiers receive a portion of any...

Read more


Advisory Opinions and the Problem of Legal Authority

Apr. 20, 2021—Christian R. Burset | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 621 (2021) | The prohibition against advisory opinions is fundamental to our understanding of federal judicial power, but we have misunderstood its origins. Discussions of the doctrine begin not with a constitutional text or even a court case, but a letter in which the Jay Court rejected...

Read more


The Loudest Voice at the Supreme Court: The Solicitor General’s Dominance of Amicus Oral Argument

Apr. 20, 2021—Darcy Covert & Annie J. Wang | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 681 (2021) | The Solicitor General (“SG”) is often called the “Tenth Justice,” a title that captures his unique relationship with the Supreme Court and his independence from the executive branch. No phenomenon better reflects this relationship than the Court’s practice of permitting amici...

Read more


Deterring Algorithmic Manipulation

Mar. 24, 2021—Gina-Gail S. Fletcher | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 259 (2021) | Does the existing anti-manipulation framework effectively deter algorithmic manipulation? With the dual increase of algorithmic trading and the occurrence of “mini-flash crashes” in the market linked to manipulation, this question has become more pressing in recent years. In the past thirty years, the financial...

Read more