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Notes Category

After Action: The U.S. Drone Program’s Expansion of International Law Justification for Use of Force Against Imminent Threats

Jan. 27, 2023—Elodie O. Currier | 76 Vand. L. Rev. 259 Until the 2000s, the United States’ attempts to shift international legal norms on imminence to allow for greater use of armed force abroad were largely unsuccessful. In the past two decades, however, drone use and careful legal gamesmanship by U.S. officials have opened an unprecedentedly broad...

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Call Me, Beep Me, If You Want to Reach Me: Utilizing Telemedicine to Expand Abortion Access

Jan. 27, 2023—Samantha A. Hunt | 76 Vand. L. Rev. 323 In June 2022, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The decision confirmed what the public already knew. An anonymously leaked draft version of what ultimately became Justice Samuel Alito’s majority opinion had braced the country for Dobbs’s key...

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Can’t Really Teach: CRT Bans Impose Upon Teachers’ First Amendment Pedagogical Rights

Nov. 22, 2022—Mary Lindsay Krebs | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 1925 The jurisprudence governing K-12 teachers’ speech protection has been a convoluted hodgepodge of caselaw since the 1960s when the Supreme Court established that teachers retain at least some First Amendment protection as public educators. Now, as new so-called Critical Race Theory bans prohibit an array of...

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Conservation Options: Conservation Easements, Flexibility, and the “In Perpetuity” Requirement of IRC § 170(h)

Oct. 20, 2022—Molly Teague | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 1573 Conservation easements have been closely tied to tax incentives since the 1970s, when Congress passed legislation to encourage land preservation. In an attempt to balance the desire to conserve more land with the desire to prevent tax abuses, Congress later passed § 170(h) of the Internal Revenue Code,...

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Why Can’t We Be FRANDs?: Anti-Suit Injunctions, International Comity, and International Commercial Arbitration in Standard-Essential Patent Litigation

Oct. 20, 2022—Raghavendra R. Murthy | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 1609 Picking up a smartphone to contact someone across the globe is facilitated by technical standards like 5G. These standards allow for technological compatibility worldwide. For instance, a 5G capable device can connect to 5G networks anywhere in the world because the same 5G standard is used...

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Deliberately Indifferent: Institutional Liability for Further Harassment in Student-on-Student Title IX Cases

May. 18, 2022—Jacob R. Goodman | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 1273 (2022) | Sexual harassment is an unfortunate problem far too many have experienced. Universities and other educational institutions owe a duty, both legal and moral, to protect students from sexual harassment, and in turn to allow students to receive the full benefits of their education. But a...

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Finding the Boundaries of Equitable Disgorgement

May. 18, 2022—Cameron K. Hood | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 1307 (2022) | The disgorgement of “ill-gotten gains” is a significant mechanism for enforcing the securities laws. By compelling a violator of the securities laws to forfeit their illegal proceeds, disgorgement serves as a strong deterrent for securities fraud and an important method by which investors are compensated...

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What’s the Deference? Interpreting the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines After Kisor

Apr. 21, 2022—Liam Murphy | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 957 (2022) | For more than three decades, the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines have constrained the punishment doled out by federal judges, limiting discretion that was once nearly unlimited and bringing standardization to the penological decisionmaking process. For twice as long, the Supreme Court has constrained judges in a different...

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Policing, Masculinities, and Judicial Acknowledgment

Apr. 21, 2022—Nicholas J. Prendergast | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 997 (2022) | In the 1980s, the Supreme Court held that courts must consider the “totality of the circumstances” when deciding the reasonableness of a police officer’s conduct in an excessive force suit. To this day, the precise meaning of “reasonableness” remains elusive. For years, courts around the...

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Should It Stay or Should It Go: The Clash of Canons over Termination of the Automatic Stay for Repeat Filers

Mar. 22, 2022—John H. Gibbons | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 615 (2022) | One of the most important debtor protections provided by bankruptcy law is the automatic stay, which stops creditors from pursuing collection actions against the debtor. Over time, however, debtors began to abuse the stay by repeatedly filing for bankruptcy each time a creditor tried to...

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Challenging the Challengers: How Partisan Citizen Observers Contribute to Disenfranchisement and Undermine Election Integrity

Mar. 22, 2022—Kate Uyeda | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 657 (2022) | Almost every state allows political parties to sponsor and train private citizens to serve as election observers and sometimes even to challenge the eligibility of other private citizens to vote. These partisan citizen observers, referred to in this Note as “PCOs,” have far too often perpetuated...

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A Machete for the Patent Thicket

Jan. 24, 2022—Lisa Orucevic | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 277 (2022) | Outrageous drug prices have dominated news coverage of the American healthcare system for years. Yet despite widespread condemnation of skyrocketing drug prices, nothing seems to change. Pharmaceutical companies can raise drug prices with impunity because they hold patents on their drugs, which give them monopolies. These...

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Dynamic Corporate Purpose

Jan. 24, 2022—Fields Pierce | 75 Vand. L. Rev. 325 (2022) | The debate over corporate purpose has turned into a “gordian knot” where parties with entrenched beliefs about what the corporation should or should not be within society refuse to waver. There are inherent flaws with the governance models proposed by academics, politicians, and practitioners alike, so...

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Underwater Mortgages for Underwater Homes: The Elimination of Signals in the Coastal Lending Market

Oct. 19, 2021—Peyton J. Klein | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1467 (2021) | Climate change and sea level rise threaten to increase the default risk of mortgages on homes in coastal areas. Faced with this reality, small coastal lenders have begun selling more climate-sensitive mortgages to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, thereby transferring the risk of climate-induced...

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Let’s Talk About Gender: Nonbinary Title VII Plaintiffs Post-Bostock

Oct. 19, 2021—Meredith Rolfs Severtson | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1507 (2021) | In Bostock v. Clayton County, the Supreme Court held that Title VII’s sex-discrimination prohibition applies to discrimination against gay and transgender employees. This decision, surprising from a conservative Court, has engendered a huge amount of commentary on both its substantive holding and its interpretive...

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The Duty to Update Corporate Emissions Pledges

May. 28, 2021—Nathan Campbell | 74 Vand. L. Rev. 1137 (2021) | Facing both internal and external market pressures, a rapidly growing number of private companies are making public, voluntary, and ambitious pledges to reduce or outright eliminate by a certain date or benchmark their greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, ambition and necessity notwithstanding, nonfulfillment of these emission...

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