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Penile Polygraphy: The Admissibility of Penile Plethysmography Results at Sentencing in Tennessee

Jan. 28, 2019—Penile-Polygraphy-The-Admissibility-of-Penile-Plethysmograph-Results-at-Sentencing-in-Tennessee State judges in Tennessee currently consider the results of penile plethysmograph (“PPG”) evaluations when sentencing convicted sex offenders. These highly intrusive physical tests purport to identify whether an offender’s arousal is considered “deviant” by measuring the change in penis size after viewing various stimuli. Because the results are usually buried in psychosexual evaluations that...

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Extinguishing the Firewall: Addressing the Jurisdictional Challenges to Bringing Cyber Tort Suits Against Foreign Sovereigns

Jan. 28, 2019—Extinguishing-the-Firewall-Addressing-the-Jurisdictional-Challenges-to-Bringing-Cyber-Tort-Suits-Against-Foreign-Sovereigns The rapid advancement of technology has resulted in new forms of tortious activity. Increasingly, these cyber torts are perpetrated by foreign states. Notwithstanding other barriers to collecting damages for a cyber tort, a plaintiff suing for a foreign-state-perpetrated cyber tort must prove that the alleged tortious activity satisfies one of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities...

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Common Sense: Rethinking the New Common Rule’s Weak Protections for Human Subjects

Oct. 19, 2018—Common-Sense-Rethinking-the-New-Common-Rule27s-Weak-Protections-for-Human-Subjects ABSTRACT: Since 1991, the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, known as the “Common Rule,” has protected the identifiable private information of human subjects who participate in federally funded research initiatives. Although the research landscape has drastically changed since 1991, the Common Rule has remained mostly unchanged since its promulgation. In an...

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Trafficked in Texas: Combatting the Sex-Trafficking Epidemic Through Prostitution Law and Sentencing Reform in the Lone Star State

Oct. 19, 2018—Trafficked-in-Texas-Combatting-the-Sex-Trafficking-Epidemic-Through-Prostitution-Law-and-Sentencing-Reform-in-the-Lone-Star-State ABSTRACT: American law has historically treated prostitution as a victimless crime, a moral trespass between two consenting individuals, rather than a potential act of violence, a product of fraud or coercion. However, growing awareness of the international sex-trafficking epidemic has brought long-settled prostitution law once more under the critical eye of academics and lawmakers...

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Rethinking Conspiracy Jurisdiction in Light of Stream of Commerce and Effects-Based Jurisdictional Principles

May. 22, 2018—Rethinking-Conspiracy-Jurisdiction-in-Light-of-Stream-of-Commerce-and-Effects-Based-Jurisdictional-Principles ABSTRACT For decades, some courts have been willing to exercise personal jurisdiction over nonresident defendants based solely on the forum contacts of their coconspirators. This practice, termed “conspiracy jurisdiction,” has proven controversial among courts and commentators alike. On one hand, the actions of one member of a conspiracy are ordinarily attributable to other members...

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Neuronal Testimonial: Brain-Computer Interfaces and the Law

May. 22, 2018—Neuronal-Testimonial-Brain-Computer-Interfaces-and-the-Law ABSTRACT Scientific researchers have developed a method of using brain-scanning technology to determine if patients in a coma-like condition, known as a “vegetative state,” are conscious despite their inability to communicate verbally or via motor actions. While in a brain scanner, patients “answer” yes-or-no questions by envisioning specific scenarios that activate different parts of...

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A Taste of Their Own Medicine: Examining the Admissibility of Experts’ Prior Malpractice Under the Federal Rules of Evidence

Apr. 18, 2018—A-Taste-of-Their-Own-Medicine ABSTRACT Expert witnesses play an important role in medical malpractice cases by persuading juries to adopt a theory favorable to their party. Their credibility and competency influence the jury’s decision, so parties seek to discredit opposing experts through cross-examination about their own malpractice as a provider of medical care. This evidence suggests a propensity...

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Combating the Enemy Within: Regulating Employee Misappropriation of Business Information

Apr. 18, 2018—Combating-the-Enemy-Within ABSTRACT Technological advancements vastly improve efficiency and productivity in the workplace. However, technology also brings with it the ability to transmit mass amounts of business information with ease. As technology continues to evolve and become increasingly prevalent in the modern workplace, the insider presents a considerable threat to employers. In fact, employers increasingly face...

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Sink or Sell: Using Real Estate Purchase Options to Facilitate Coastal Retreat

Mar. 13, 2018—Sink-or-Sell-Using-Real-Estate-Purchase-Options-to-Facilitate-Coastal-Retreat ABSTRACT Despite the political contention surrounding climate change, scientists almost universally agree that sea levels are rising and will continue to do so. In light of this inevitability, commentators and policymakers have begun to recognize that retreat—the withdrawal of people and development from coastal areas—will become necessary, at least in certain areas. Even so,...

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Invisible Bars: Adapting the Crime of False Imprisonment to Better Address Coercive Control and Domestic Violence in Tennessee

Mar. 13, 2018—Invisible-Bars-Adapting-The-Crime-of-False-Imprisonment-to-Better-Address-Coercive-Control-and-Domestic-Violence-in-Tennessee ABSTRACT On average, three or more women are murdered by their intimate partners in the United States every day. Despite the now well-known correlation between coercive control—the strategic use of oppressive behavior to control primarily female partners—and intimate partner homicide, most states continue to focus their criminal domestic violence laws solely on physical violence....

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Signed, Sealed, Delivered—Not Yours: Why the Fair Labor Standards Act Offers a Framework for Regulating Gestational Surrogacy

Jan. 18, 2018—Signed, Sealed, Delivered ABSTRACT Over the past several decades, gestational surrogacy has emerged as a rapidly growing industry. Such growth has prompted an enormous amount of debate among scholars, human rights advocates, economists, and the media over a wide array of legal and ethical issues. This debate is perhaps most evident in the divergence of...

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Restore, Revert, Repeat: Examining the Decompensation Cycle and the Due Process Limitations on the Treatment of Incompetent Defendants

Jan. 18, 2018—Restore, Revert, Repeat ABSTRACT Though correctional facilities are one of the largest providers of mental health care in the country, the treatment provided often fails to address the needs of many mentally ill inmates. Indeed, after receiving treatment at a state mental health facility, many pretrial detainees who have been recently restored to competency revert...

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Going Postal: Analyzing the Abuse of Mail Covers Under the Fourth Amendment

Oct. 7, 2017—Going Postal ABSTRACT Since at least the late 1800s, the United States government has regularly tracked the mail of many of its citizens. In 2014 alone, for example, the government recorded all data on the outside of the mail parcels of over 50,000 individuals via a surveillance initiative known as the mail covers program. In...

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Do Your Job: Judicial Review of Occupational Licensing in the Face of Economic Protectionism

Oct. 7, 2017—Do Your Job ABSTRACT Despite efforts to challenge certain occupational licensing schemes as impermissibly driven by naked economic protectionism, federal appellate courts disagree on the legitimacy owed to the protectionist motivations that commonly prompt these regulations. To eliminate the current confusion, this Note advocates for the application of rational-basis-with-judicial-engagement review. The Supreme Court has demonstrated...

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For What It’s Worth: The Role of Race- and Gender-Based Data in Civil Damages Awards

May. 10, 2017—For What It’s Worth: The Role of Race- and Gender-Based Data in Civil Damages Awards AUTHOR J.D. Candidate, 2017, Vanderbilt University Law School; B.S. & B.A., 2014, University of Florida.

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Police Violence Against People with Mental Disabilities: The Immutable Duty Under the ADA to Reasonably Accommodate During Arrest

May. 10, 2017—Police Violence Against People with Mental Disabilities: The Immutable Duty Under the ADA to Reasonably Accommodate During Arrest AUTHOR J.D. Candidate, 2017, Vanderbilt University Law School; B.A., 2012, University of Florida.

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