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Shackling Prejudice: Expanding the Deck v. Missouri Rule to Nonjury Proceedings

Mar. 25, 2020—Sadie Shourd | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 535 (2020) | Courts in the United States have traditionally held that criminal defendants have the right to be free from unwarranted restraints visible to the jury during the guilt phase of a trial. The term “unwarranted restraints” refers to the use of restraints on a defendant absent...

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Artistic Justice: How the Executive Branch Can Facilitate Nazi-Looted Art Restitution

Mar. 25, 2020—Paige Tenkhoff | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 569 (2020) | Eight decades after the Holocaust, many pieces of art stolen from Jewish families still sit in the state-owned museums of former Nazialigned regimes. In an effort to right old wrongs, plaintiffs are bringing suit in the United States against the foreign governments who retain the...

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Privative Copyright

Jan. 21, 2020—Shyamkrishna Balganesh | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 1 (2020) | “Privative” copyright claims are infringement actions brought by authors for the unauthorized public dissemination of works that are private, unpublished, and revelatory of the author’s personal identity. Driven by considerations of authorial autonomy, dignity, and personality rather than monetary value, these claims are almost as...

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Popular Constitutional Argument

Jan. 21, 2020—Tom Donnelly | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 73 (2020)| Critics have long attacked popular constitutionalists for offering few clues about how their theory might work in practice—especially inside the courts. These critics are right. Popular constitutionalism—as a matter of both theory and practice—remains a work in progress. In this Article, I take up the challenge...

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Misaligned Lawmaking

Jan. 21, 2020—Timothy Meyer | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 151 (2020) | Since 1962, when Congress passed the Trade Expansion Act, every new U.S. trade deal has had the same essential bargain at its core. Congress agrees to give the president the power to lower trade barriers, while at the same time providing adjustment assistance for those...

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Golden Parachutes and the Limits of Shareholder Voting

Jan. 21, 2020—Albert H. Choi, Andrew C.W. Lund & Robert Schonlau | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 223 (2020) | With the passage of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in 2010, Congress attempted to constrain change-in-control payments (also known as “golden parachutes”) by giving shareholders the right to approve or disapprove such payments on...

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Dissecting Revlon: Severing the Standard of Conduct from the Standard of Review in Post-Closing Litigation

Jan. 21, 2020—Katie Clemmons | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 267 (2020) | In Corwin v. KKR Financial Holdings LLC and its progeny, the Delaware courts made clear that a fully informed, uncoerced vote by disinterested stockholders triggers the waste standard. In Corwin, the Delaware Supreme Court also indicated that Revlon was only meant to provide stockholders with...

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Inflated Private Offering: Regulating Corporate Insiders and Market-Moving Disclosures on Social Media

Jan. 21, 2020—Marisa Papenfuss | 73 Vand. L. Rev. 311 (2020) | The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission enacted Regulation Fair Disclosure (“Regulation FD”) to prohibit companies from disclosing material information to select parties but not the public at large. The rapid advancement of technology since Regulation FD’s enactment has dramatically altered the ways companies distribute information...

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Introduction: Professor Randall Thomas’s Depolarizing and Neutral Approach to Shareholder Rights

Nov. 25, 2019—James D. Cox & Frank Partnoy | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1755 (2019) | Like Gaul, corporate law scholarship can be divided into three overflowing buckets: pro-manager, pro-shareholder, and empirical. We classify empirical scholarship as a separate category, in significant part because of Professor Randall Thomas. In the pre-Thomas era, much of the literature fell...

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Mootness Fees

Nov. 25, 2019—Matthew D. Cain, Jill E. Fisch, Steven Davidoff Solomon, & Randall S. Thomas | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1777 (2019) | In response to a sharp increase in litigation challenging mergers, the Delaware Chancery Court issued the 2016 Trulia decision, which substantively reduced the attractiveness of Delaware as a forum for these suits. In this...

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Automating Securities Class Action Settlements

Nov. 25, 2019—Jessica Erickson | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1817 (2019) | Securities class actions are supposed to vindicate the rights of investors injured by corporate fraud. Yet, despite multimillion- or even multibillion-dollar settlements, many injured investors never receive a dime in compensation. To receive money from a settlement in a securities class action, investors must comply...

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The Case for Individual Audit Partner Accountability

Nov. 25, 2019—Colleen Honigsberg | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1871 (2019) | Despite repeated regulatory interventions, accounting failures continue to persist in companies around the world. In this Article, I explain why regulatory oversight, private enforcement, and firm-level reputational sanctions are unlikely to induce accountants to take optimal levels of care when auditing corporate financials. Instead, our...

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Lead Plaintiff Incentives in Aggregate Litigation

Nov. 25, 2019—Charles R. Korsmo & Minor Myers | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1923 (2019) | The lead plaintiff role holds out considerable promise in promoting the deterrence and compensation goals of aggregate litigation. The prevailing approach to compensating lead plaintiffs, however, provides no real incentive for a lead plaintiff to bring claims on behalf of a...

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After Corwin: Down the Controlling Shareholder Rabbit Hole

Nov. 25, 2019—Ann M. Lipton | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1977 (2019) | As Delaware has developed its doctrine with respect to controlling shareholders, its view of their relationship to directors has evolved. This evolution has produced some pronounced inconsistencies with respect to the weight placed on director approval of controlling shareholder action. The recent Delaware Supreme...

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Corporate Oversight and Disobedience

Nov. 25, 2019—Elizabeth Pollman | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 2013 (2019) | Over a decade has passed since landmark Delaware corporate law decisions on oversight responsibility, and only a small handful of cases have survived a motion to dismiss. Scholars have puzzled over what it means to have the potential for corporate accountability lodged within the duty...

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Calculating SEC Whistleblower Awards: A Theoretical Approach

Nov. 25, 2019—Amanda Rose | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 2047 (2019) | The Dodd-Frank Act provides that Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) whistleblower awards must equal not less than ten and not more than thirty percent of the monetary penalties collected in the action to which they relate; SEC Rule 21F-6 provides criteria that the SEC may...

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