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Taking Laughter Seriously at the Supreme Court

Oct. 11, 2019—Tonja Jacobi & Matthew Sag | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1423 (2019) | Laughter in Supreme Court oral arguments has been misunderstood, treated as either a lighthearted distraction from the Court’s serious work, or interpreted as an equalizing force in an otherwise hierarchical environment. Examining the more than nine thousand instances of laughter witnessed at...

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Antitrust in Digital Markets

Oct. 11, 2019—John M. Newman | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1497 (2019) | Antitrust law has largely failed to address the challenges posed by digital markets. At the turn of the millennium, the antitrust enterprise engaged in intense debate over whether antitrust doctrine, much of it developed during a bygone era of smokestack industries, could or should...

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The Missing Regulatory State: Monitoring Businesses in an Age of Surveillance

Oct. 11, 2019—Rory Van Loo | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1563 (2019) | An irony of the information age is that the companies responsible for the most extensive surveillance of individuals in history—large platforms such as Amazon, Facebook, and Google—have themselves remained unusually shielded from being monitored by government regulators. But the legal literature on state information...

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You Get What You Pay For: An Empirical Examination of the Use of MTurk in Legal Scholarship

Oct. 11, 2019—Robertson & Yoon | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1633 (2019) | In recent years, legal scholars have come to rely on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (“MTurk”) platform to recruit participants for surveys and experiments. Despite MTurk’s popularity, there is no generally accepted methodology for its use in legal scholarship, and many questions remain about the validity...

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Can and Should Universal Injunctions Be Saved?

Oct. 11, 2019—Szymon S. Barnas | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1675 (2019) | The practice of a federal district court judge halting the government’s enforcement of an executive action against not only the parties before the court but against anyone, anywhere, may be coming to an end. Multiple Supreme Court Justices have expressed their skepticism in the...

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Reestablishing a Knowledge Mens Rea Requirement for Armed Career Criminal Act “Violent Felonies” Post-Voisine

Oct. 11, 2019—Jeffrey A. Turner | 72 Vand. L. Rev. 1717 (2019) | Until 2016, federal courts unanimously concluded that predicate offenses for the Armed Career Criminal Act (“ACCA”) required a knowledge mens rea. Therefore, any state law crimes that could be committed with a reckless mens rea were not “violent felonies” and could not serve as...

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Summer 2019 Alumni Newsletter

Sep. 5, 2019—Alumni Newsletter Summer 2019

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Neighborhood Names: Why Should the Law Care?

Aug. 27, 2019—Nadav Shoked | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 267 | Names matter. We all realize that they matter for our lives, but we do not intuitively assume that names matter for the law just as well. And yet, in many legal fields, they clearly do. In international law, the question what country gets to...

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Corporate Incapacitation: A Handmaid’s Tale?

Aug. 27, 2019—Mihailis E. Diamantis | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 251 | In Incapacitating Criminal Corporations, W. Robert Thomas argues that corporate criminal law should think more creatively about incapacitation. As a general rule, I could not agree more with his motivating sentiment: inflexible dominant paradigms have stifled thought about how to sanction corporations for...

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Chancery Court Applies M&F Framework to Transactions in Which Controlling Stockholders Allegedly Received “Unique Benefits”

May. 9, 2019—Robert S. Reder & Elizabeth F. Shore | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 221 | MFW Trio | Chancery Court Applies M&F Framework to Transactions in Which Controlling Stockholders Allegedly Received “Unique Benefits” | PDF Download Link | Three recent Chancery Court decisions focus on circumstances in which controlling stockholders, each alleged to have...

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Chancery Court Finds that Adverse Directors Not Entitled to Privileged Board Communications Concerning a Potential Merger

May. 9, 2019—Robert S. Reder & Katie Clemmons | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 249 | CBS Litigation | Chancery Court Finds that Adverse Directors Not Entitled to Privileged Board Communications Concerning a Potential Merger | PDF Download Link | Chancellor Andre G. Bouchard’s letter ruling in CBS Litigation provides a useful analysis how a board...

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Chancery Court Finds Corwin Applicable to Third-Party Buyout of a Company Controlled by a Large Stockholder

May. 9, 2019—Robert S. Reder | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 213 | English v. Narang | Chancery Court Finds Corwin Applicable to Third-Party Buyout of a Company Controlled by a Large Stockholder | PDF Download Link | The Chancery Court again considered the availability of a Corwin defense in connection with a third-party buyout of...

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Delaware Supreme Court Explores Application of MFW’s “Ab Initio” Requirement in Controlling Stockholder-Related Litigation

May. 9, 2019—Robert S. Reder | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 237 | Synutra and Olenik Appeals | Refusing to draw a bright-line, the Court focuses on the point at which “substantive economic negotiations” begin in determining whether failure to include MFW’s dual procedural protections in the initial offer may not be fatal to pleading-stage dismissal...

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Delaware Chancery Court Rejects Federal Forum Selection Clause for Securities Act Claims

May. 3, 2019—Robert S. Reder & Jóna N. Mays | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 183 | Sciabacucchi | Citing Boilermakers ruling, court distinguishes between internal and external claims | PDF Download Link | Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster granted summary judgment to a plaintiff who attacked three such forum selection clauses, opinion that “[t]he constitutive...

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Towards Optimal Enforcement

Apr. 2, 2019—Kent Barnett | 72 Vand. L. Rev. En Banc 127 | Enforcing federal law seems simple enough. Federal agencies, which exist for exactly this purpose, enforce by identifying violations of a particular federal statutory scheme and accompanying regulations. But complications quickly arise. How should agencies enforce—by initiating judicial proceedings, by enacting rules or guidance to...

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Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins (2015)

Sep. 16, 2015—Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins was argued before the Supreme Court on November 2, 2015. In Spokeo, the Court considered whether Congress may confer Article III standing upon plaintiffs who suffer no concrete injury by vesting them with a private right of action to enforce a statutory requirement. The case may have broad-reaching impacts upon standing doctrine...

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